Thursday, Apr 9, 2020

Supreme Court Reconsiders Ban on Public Funding for Religious Schools

Is the legal dispute used by states to bar public funding of religious education constitutional?

Must Read

Have You Reached Your Max Heart Rate for God?

Are there areas of your life that are not being done wholeheartedly for the Lord? Use every area of your life to bring glory to God.

3 Factors of Church Growth That Are Dangerous and Spiritually Wicked

Is all church growth a good thing? Examine these 3 factors. Do any explain why the masses flock to your church?

The Fear of Being Alone: Honoring Purpose Over Marital Status

The fear of being alone and the focus on our marital status can shift our attention away from the purpose God has for our lives.

When a Montana tax credit program for private school scholarships was accused of being discriminatory because religious schools were not eligible, the state eliminated the program outright rather than fight the case.

But now, the state has ended up at the US Supreme Court anyway, with a legal dispute centering around whether the legal basis Montana (and dozens of other states) uses to bar public funding of religious education is constitutional.

The justices will hear arguments in Espinoza vs. Montana Department of Revenue, a case over a scholarship program for private K-12 education that makes donors eligible for up to $150 in state tax credits. Advocates on both sides say the outcome could be momentous because it could lead to efforts in other states to funnel taxpayer money to religious schools.

Montana is among 37 states that have provisions in their state constitutions that prohibit religious schools from receiving state aid, also known as Blaine amendments.

Legal advocates and Christian schools opposed to the restrictions say they discriminate against religious families by blocking them from government benefits available to others, or by favoring secular education. They also note that such prohibitions were historically designed to not to keep the government from endorsing religion—since a Protestant ethos was generally part of public education—but to deny support to Catholic (“sectarian”) schools in particular.

Like many religious freedom cases, this one floats the balance between the establishment clause—the government cannot support a particular faith over others—and the free exercise clause—it cannot prohibit citizens from exercising their religious beliefs.

In a brief …

Continue reading

News brought to you by Christianity Today

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Featured

The Safety and Danger of Psalm 91: Rightly Dividing God’s Promise

Psalm 91 is a favorite of many - even Satan tried to reference it! Let's take a look at its promise of God's safety and the subtle ways we can misinterpret the text.

The Rainbow Belongs to God: Teen Takes a Stand for God in Nike Kyrie 5 Shoes

California teen takes a bold stand for God and the rainbow in his Nike Kyrie 5 rainbow shoes. Take a walk in the shoes of this young teammate.

Living Fit and Free: One Woman’s Story of Quitting Diets and Finding Health

Are you struggling to get off diet plans and make peace with your body image? Be inspired by Marsha Apsley and her journey to living fit and free.

Team Jesus Locker Room Chat w/ Greg Kirkland, Jr.

Teammate Greg Kirkland, Jr., founder of The SEEiT Choir, shares his testimony on life, family, and the heart behind his "SEEiT" brand.

Vanessa Bell Calloway on “Harriet”: Faith, Family, and Playing With a Bad Set of Cards

Vanessa Bell Calloway chats with Team Jesus Magazine on "Harriet" - the importance of faith, family, and playing to win with a bad set of cards.
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

News brought to you by Christianity Today

X